Blog Latest news and views

Funerals: almost anything goes

The first time I conducted a funeral for a biker whose hearse was a motorcycle and side-car, a long procession of his fellow bikers roared through the town behind it. The conductor (the person in charge from the Co-op) rode pillion, wearing his top hat. The chapel filled with men and women in motorcycle gear and the sound of leather creaking as they moved about. Such events are no longer unusual, and the people who provide the motorcycle hearses are kept very busy.

Today, The Co-operative Funeralcare has released a report into changing funeral customs, The Ways We Say Goodbye, which shows that, among other things, “Half of today’s funerals (49%) are a celebration of life and one in ten includes no religion at all.” In a relatively short period of time, maybe twenty years, attitudes towards funerals have changed as most people have realised that a traditional Christian funeral isn’t compulsory, and has little relevance to the lives of a majority of people.

Click here to find out more about Humanist funerals

Click here for my Dead Interesting blog

Financial Independence Through Entrepreneurship

You may already have heard of Kiva. You may already be a Kiva lender. But if you haven’t, this video explains how you can help women around the world, not with charity or gifts, but with a small loan. When it’s paid back (I’ve been lending a while now, and none of my entrepreneurs has defaulted), you can re-lend the money to someone else. A minimum of $25 at a time, adding more as you go on, and eventually you may have a portfolio of several $100. It’s the only way I’ll ever be a financier!

Annual General Meeting

Reports on our activities, plans for the coming year, and the election of officers and committee members.

Suffolk Humanist astronomer on BBC Look East

Tom BolesSuffolk Humanists & Secularists newest committee member Tom Boles was on BBC Look East yesterday, filmed at his Coddenham observatory with BBC presenter Richard Daniel. They were there to talk about the partial eclipse of the sun but there was too much cloud cover to see it, so they talked about Tom’s achievements instead. Tom set a world record last year for spotting more supernova than anyone else.

You have a few hours left to see the interview, about 22 minutes into the programme, if you click here.

A Humanist’s view of Christmas celebrations

Suffolk Humanists & Secularists member Penny Binsted wrote the following article for the Lawshall (Suffolk) village newsletter. She says, “It has been very well received and I have had many positive comments! Maybe there are more closet Humanists than people like to admit.”

As Christmas is meant to be a celebration for Jesus’s birthday it is obvious to me that I have nothing to celebrate as I am a humanist. Humanism is the conviction that we can make sense of the world using reason, experience and shared human values and that we can all lead good lives without religious or superstitious beliefs. Humanists make the best of the one life we have by creating meaning and purpose for ourselves. We choose to take responsibility for our actions and work with others for the common good.

The number of people in the UK choosing non-religious humanist ceremonies for births, marriages and deaths is growing rapidly, as is the membership of the British Humanist Association, from Professor Richard Dawkins (Vice President of the British Humanists), Professor Susan Blackmore, the late Claire Rayner, Ricky Gervais, Rowan Atkinson, Woody Allen, the authors Philip Pullman and Terry Pratchett, to politicians Roy Hattersley and Ken Livingstone. The journalist Polly Toynbee is the current President of the British Humanist Association and all three main parties in the House of Commons have Humanist groups.

The history of Christmas celebrations is eclectic – for thousands of years in Europe, in Scandinavia communities celebrated life in midwinter, with eating and drinking, around the time of the shortest day on December 21st. It is highly unlikely that Jesus Christ was born on 25th December, and there were no  Church celebrations for Christmas until the 4th century as there was disapproval of the Pagan festivities. Then Christians adopted the old Pagan festival of Midwinter, making it a joint secular and religious event – it is now a jumble of ancient customs and more recent inventions: many of our ‘traditions’ like Santa Claus, Christmas trees, cards, gifts and turkeys are all fairly recent, mostly Victorian inventions from Prince Albert.